Issue #5 Cover Issue #28 Cover

Formerly known as the Dogtown Territorial Quarterly

California History At Its Very Best

To Read a Full Length Sample Article Click Here

Special California Bear Flag Revolt Issue

 

[1990 Issues #1-4 | 1991 Issues #5-8 | 1992 Issues #9-12 | 1993 Issues #13-16]

[1994 Issues #17-20 | 1995 Issues #21-24 | 1996 Issues #25-28 | 1997 Issues #29-32]

[1998-2010 Issues #33-84]

Thank you for checking out this listing of our current California Territorial Quarterly issues and previous issues of the Dogtown Territorial Quarterly. There are links to each of the years of Dogtown Territorial Quarterly issues (#1-50) above. A short review of each article is also included.

DTQ back issues sell individually for $5.75; $4.50 each if you purchase four or more issues. Add $3.00 shipping per order.

A complete set of issues #1-50 sells for $225.00 shipped in the United States. Add $10.00 shipping. Total delivered price: $235.00

Issues #2 & #3 are not available except in complete sets.

Subscriptions to the California Territorial Quarterly (new name beginning with issue #51) are $18 per year in the United States.

CTQ back issues sell individually for $5.75; $4.50 each if you purchase four or more issues. Add $3.00 shipping per order.

Send Orders to: DTQ, 6848 U Skyway, Paradise, California 95969

To Order With a Credit Card Call 1-877-397-3363

All Other Calls (530) 872-3363

We Accept Orders Monday - Friday from 9am to 9pm
Saturdays 9am to 3pm

Retail Store Open 10am-5pm Monday-Friday,
10am-3pm Saturdays (Pacific Time)

email: info@californiahistory.com

 

Articles in 1993 Spring Issue #13

Special Bear Flag Revolt Issue

Issue #13 Cover

Ezekiel Merritt,
The Leader of the Bear Flag Revolt

By Benjamin M. Hughes

Contrary to popular belief, William B. Ide was not the leader of the Bear Flag Revolt. The real leader of the motley group was a tall, fearless, illiterate, buckskin-clad mountain man named Ezekiel Merritt. Ben Hughes proves his point in his examination of the life of Merritt and his involvement in the Bear Flag Revolt.

The Bear Flag Revolt
William B. Ide and the California Republic

By Joe D. Hood

Joe Hood documents the involvement of William B. Ide in the Bear Flag Revolt and the surrounding events that occured in Sonoma in June 1846.

The Popular Movement and Sutter's Fort
An Interpretive View

By George R. Stammerjohan

George Stammerjohan gives an interpretive view of the events that occurred on June 16, 1846 and their effect upon John Sutter and his fort. He also discusses Sutter's decision to resign his Mexican commissions and the harsh treatment he received from John C. Fremont who took over control of his fort.

Vallejo, A California Legend
The Bear Flag Incident

By Alexander Hunter

Excerpted from his book "Vallejo, A California Legend," Alexander Hunter reveals the effects of the Bear Flag Revolt upon General Mariano Vallejo who was captured by the Bear Flaggers and transported to Sutter's Fort where he was imprisoned.

John Bidwell & the Bear Flag Revolt
By Lois H. McDonald

John Bidwell had been in California five years prior to the Bear Flag Revolt. As an employee of John Sutter he was in charge of Sutter's Fort when Captain John Fremont arrived at the fort in search of supplies in December 1845. Later Bidwell met marine Lt. Archibald Gillespie and directed him to the path Fremont had taken north from Sutter's Fort after a confrontation with Jose Castro near San Juan Bautista. Although Bidwell was not involved in the takeover at Sonoma, he wrote the statement of purpose for the Bear Flaggers and served in the California Battalion.

Nomlaki and the Nomlacki Reservation
By John Furry

The Nomlaki comprised a population of about 2000 individual Indians at the time of European contact in the 1830s. Their numbers were devastated by the malaria epidemic of 1833 which had been spread by the fur traders. A 25,000-acre reservation was established for the remants of the tribe in 1854 near Tehama, California known as the Nomlacki Reservation.

Peace & Friendship
Pierson B. Reading, Tom Hill & the California Battalion

By Eleanor Lee Templeman

Tom Hill was an educated Delaware Indian who became a mountain man when he joined a band of trappers led by Kit Carson. He later lived among the Nez Perce Indians in Montana. In 1846, rumors of an approaching Indian war party of "1000 Walla Walla warriers" reached Sutter's Fort. The war party turned out to be a friendly trading group of 40 Indians, including Tom Hill. Fremont was in need of men for the California Battalion and recruited the Indians into Company H. Hill joined a company of white volunteers where he eventually met Major Pierson B. Reading, paymaster of the battalion. They would end up becoming close friends.

William C. Moon, Henry L. Ford
and the Bear Flag Revolt

By Margaret Bauer

William Moon owned and operated a store, hotel and ferry at the Moon House located on the Sacramento River across from Peter Lassen's Rancho Bosquejo. Moon's place was a familiar sight on the well-traveled trail from Colusa to the Shasta mines. Henry Ford settled next to Moon, helped him build Moon House and spent a great deal of time trapping and trading in cattle. It was Ford who brought word to William B. Ide of General Castro's edict expelling all foreigners from California, which motivated them both to join the Bear Flaggers. Ford later served as the military leader of the Bear Flaggers in Sonoma.

A Butte County Maidu Indian Legend
By Dorothy J. Hill

A short story about a Maidu Indian legend concerning an area south of Chico, California.

Larkin & Fremont
Protagonists on the California Stage

By Lois H. McDonald

In the drama featuring the winning of California for the United States there were two major players - Thomas O. Larkin and John C. Fremont. Larkin was paid an extra stipend by President Polk to bring about a peaceful revolution in California through relationships of blood and commerce. Fremont, on the other hand, precipitated the Bear Flag Revolt (when armed conflict may not have been necessary) to procure California for the United States.

Redding vs. Reading
By Dottie Smith

When the town of Redding was established in 1872, it had been named for Benjamin B. Redding, the railroad land agent that worked for the Central Pacific Railroad. Many residents of Shasta County thought the town should have heen named for the first Shasta pioneer, Pierson B. Reading. In the 1870s Redding was renamed Reading and then renamed again to Redding! Other places named for Pierson B. Reading are included in the article.

Whiskey Won the Election
By Dottie Smith

In 1850 A.Z. McCandless rode into the town of Shasta on a small mule with his feet almost dragging on the ground. He gave one campaign speech and ended up winning the loacl election for the state assembly.

The Twain and Grays Flat Area
By John Furry

Located in the Feather River Canyon, the remnants of Twain and Grays Flat are located along the banks of the Feather River and the route of the railroad. Twain started out as Twain Siding where a hotel and store were located. Grays Flat is located a short distance away and was the site of a large lumber mill.

Who are the Cousin Jacks
By Dick Chamberlain

Cornish miners skilled in deep, hardrock mining emigrated to South Africa, Australia, Mexico and the lead mines of Wisconsin. They came to California too, reportedly to work for John Fremont in his Mariposa mines. Wherever they went they were apt to ask the mine boss, "Cap'n, do'e 'ave a job for me cousin Jack in the aould country?"

The Bear Flaggers at Sonoma
By Lois H. McDonald

A list of participants in the Bear Flag Revolt at Sonoma in June 1846.

Click Here for Trivia Test

 

 

Articles in 1993 Summer Issue #14

Issue #14 Cover

Soldiers - Pioneers - Bakers
By George R. Stammerjohan

California military historian George Stammerjohan explains why army forts were established during the 1850s and describes the mundane life of the garrison. Focusing on two soldiers, Frederick Halblieb and William Nery, he examines their daily lives while stationed at Fort Tejon and other forts.

Schliemann Slept Here
By Eleanor del Conte Wilson

Who was Heinrich Schliemann? After amassing a $200,000 fortune in international business and finance he came to Sacramento in 1851 to collect the estate of his brother Louis who had died of typhus. He soon opened a banking business buying and selling gold from the miners and turned his $200,000 stake into $400,000 in a little over a year. He later discovered the ancient ruins of Troy.

Robert B. Semple
Bear Flagger, Publisher and Town Builder, Part I

By Bill Anderson

Part one describes Robert Semple's overeland journey from Independence, Missouri with Lansford Hastings in 1845, Semple's known movements prior to June 1846 and his active involvement in the Bear Flag Revolt.

The 1993 Emigrant Trail Wagon Train
Rough & Ready to Johnson's Ranch

By Bill Knorr, Jr.

In 1986 Bill Knorr and Jim West met a the old blacksmith shop in Rough & Ready. Bill later rented a covered wagon from Jim to surprise Jack Steed and his guests that were touring historic Johnson's Ranch. While at Johnson's Ranch Bill and Jim decided to start an annual wagon train from Rough & Ready to Johnson's Ranch. Bill Knorr shares his recollections of the five-day journey of the wagon train in 1993.

Rich Bar
By John Furry

John Furry examines the gold mining area known as Rich Bar in the Feather River Canyon. It was first discovered by disappointed prospectors who were returning from the Gold Lake quest led by Thomas Stoddart in May 1850. Stoddart had claimed he found nuggets lining the banks of his "Gold Lake," but after wandering around lost for days he was threatened by his followers with Iynching and he fled to the valley. Wandering the hills on their way home, a few of them found incredible deposits of gold on the East Branch of the Feather River. It soon was known as Rich Bar.

Putting Ishi's Villages on the Map
By Steve Schoonover

Steve Schoonover has personally explored the canyons of the Yahi heartland in his quest for informationabout Ishi and the Yahi. Alfred Kroeber published a map that Ishi drew of his homeland indicating villages along Butte, Deer, Mill and Battle creeks. Steve's research has developed some new conclusions about the actual locations of the villages Ishi remembered.

Hitching a Ride With a Covered Wagon
By Bill Anderson

Dogtown Territorial Quarterly editor Bill Anderson describes his personal experience of riding in a covered wagon from Camp Far West Lake to Johnson's Ranch in April 1993. He was invited by Bill and Peggy Knorr, who along with Jim West, were the organizers of the Emigrant Trail Wagon Train that ventures each year from Rough & Ready to Wheatland, California.

Click Here for Trivia Test

 

 

Articles in 1993 Fall Issue #15

Issue #15 Cover

The Three Knolls Massacre
By Steve Schoonover

Sixteen white men seeking retribution for a pair of killings in the Concow Valley surrounded a camp on Mill Creek in mid-August 1865 and attacked without warning at dawn. All of the Indians were either killed or fled, except for a child and a woman who were taken prisoner. The woman was later slain. Steve Scoonover re-examines the facts behind the massacre and reaches some new insightful conclusions about what really occurred and where it happened.

Inside Gateway
The Last Gasp of a Hundred Year Frenzy

By Fred E. Green

This is the story of the last great railroad expansion in the United States which was built in 1931 from Klamath Falls, Oregon to Keddie, California, a distance pf some 200 miles. Fred Green recounts his personal experience as a 21-year-old "railroad man" when he worked for the Great Northern Railroad on an 88 mile section from Klamath Falls to Bieber, California.

Robert B. Semple
Bear Flagger, Publisher and Town Builder, Part 2

By Bill Anderson

Part two examines Robert Semple's partnership with Walter Colton and the founding of the first newspaper in California known as the "Monterey Californian." Semple was the first to promote statehood and the establishment of mail service in California through the pages of his newspaper. A battle of wits and words commenced shortly after the appearance of Sam Brannan's newspaper, the "California Star."

Deep Canyon - Heavy Gold
A Rich Bar Miner's Recollection

By Bill Penland

Beginning in the mid-1930s author Bill Penland and his wife Belle owned and operated a gold mining operation at Rich Bar in the majestic Feather River Canyon - the same Rich Bar from which Dame Shirley wrote her famous Shirley Letters in the 1850s. His article is excerpted from his book "Deep Canyon - Heavy Gold" and recounts some of their personal experiences while living there.

Gold Rush Silver Legacy Comes Home
By Eleanor del Conte Wilson

James Birch staked his claim in California transportation, not gold, and within six years of its founding the California Stage Company became the largest in the state. In 1852 he went home to Swansea, Massachusetts, married Julia Chance, built a mansion and returned to California. Julia Chance Birch never saw him again.

The Bidwell Era Revisited
By Lois H. McDonald

Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park comprises the former home of John and Annie Bidwell which was built in the late 1860s on their sprawling 22,000 acre Rancho Chico. Lois McDonald reveals some of the fascinating history of the Bidwells, describes the new visitor center and the Bidwell Mansion Association and introduces three regular staff members at the park.

Tom Bell, Road Agent
By Ron West

Throughout the spring of 1856 the foothill roads between Auburn and Downieville were not a safe place to travel. A group of fifty men working in small groups preyed upon lone travelers "collecting for Tom Bell." Ron West examines Bell's escapades that led to his early demise.

Archaeological Investigations of the Tuscan Formation
By John Furry

The foothill area including the volcanic Tuscan Formation which comprises leveral lava caps running from Red Bluff to Oroville contains one of the most sensitive archaeological resources in northern California. Archaeologist John Furry shares the results of Native American investigations he conducted with his Butte College Field Archaeology classes from 1991 to 1993 and compares them to previous studies.

A Trip in the Mountains and Fight With the Indians
From Hutching's "California Magazine"

A first-hand account originally published in the "Butte Union Record" describes the revenge taken by white settlers on a group of Indians living on Mill Creek for the massacre of settlers in the Concow Valley. Written by Daniel Klauberg, a member of the white avengers from the Concow Valley, the group also included the "celebrated Indian hunter, Robert Anderson," and "Hiram Goode, another celebrated Indian hunter."

Click Here for Issue #15 Trivia Test

 

 

Articles in 1993 Winter Issue #16

Issue #16 Cover

William B. Ide
Pioneer, Bear Flagger & Builder, Part I

By Benjamin M. Hughes

First of a series, part one details the early life of William B. Ide, his conversion to Mormonism and his decision to migrate with his family to Oregon. Starting out from Illinois, the article cites diary entries and personal letters to describe the journey westward in the Grigsby-Ide party until they reached Fort Hall in modern-day Idaho.

Historical Perceptions
The Controversy Surrounding William B. Ide, Part I

By Sharon A. Brown

William B. Ide, the elected Commander in Chief of the Bear Flaggers, prepared a Proclamation of the Republic of California on June 15, 1846 to validate the armed takeover of Mexican officials at Sonoma. In part one of her article Sharon Brown examines the differing ideological perspectives between the pragmatic Bear Flaggers and the idealistic William B. Ide. Although Ide was appointed Commander in Chief he did not secure the respect of the insurgents nor was his leadership well regarded.

Robert B. Semple
Bear Flagger, Publisher and Town Builder, Part 3

By Bill Anderson

Part three explores Semple's efforts to develop the town of Benicia, his stormy relationship with his partner, Thomas O. Larkin, the effect of the discovery of gold on Benicia's development and Colonel Richard B. Mason's call for a California Constitutional Convention, to which Semple was elected as a delegate.

Change of Command
By George R. Stammerjohan

Military protocol normally governed the procedures for the change of command in the army but a long-held grudge between Secretary of War Jefferson Davis and retiring Major General John Wool upset the normal change of command. George Stammerjohan explores the clash of personalities and its effect upon the lives of numerous military men.

Who Were the Victims at the Three Knolls?
By Steve Scoonover

In part two Steve Schoonover discusses the possibility that many of those killed at the Three Knolls Massacre may not have been Yahi Indians. Although widely blamed for most depredations upon northern California settlers, newspaper accounts of the time suggest that others were probably responsible.

Dogtown U.S.A. - Mono County
By Ron Tamburello

This article is the first in a series celebrating the various towns, mining camps and other settlements that were once named Dogtown. Ron Tamburello begins with the story of Dogtown in Mono County, California where Carl Norst discovered gold along the banks of Dog Creek.

Life in Hat Creek Valley at the Time of Lassen Peak's Eruption
By Paul Bowman

Paul Bowman recounts the personal experience of 90 year-old Margaret Fernando who, as a teenager, witnessed the flow of melted snow and mud through their family farm in Hat Creek Valley caused by the eruption of Mount Lassen on May 19-20, 1915.

Doc Standley, Lawman
By Lee Albright

Lee Albright presents a short story about Doc Standley, a deputy sheriff from Mendocino County who was responsible for one of the greatest manhunts ever undertaken by California lawmen in 1879.

Click Here for Trivia Test

 

To Read a Full Length Sample Article Click Here

 

[1990 Issues #1-4 | 1991 Issues #5-8 | 1992 Issues #9-12 | 1993 Issues #13-16]

[1994 Issues #17-20 | 1995 Issues #21-24 | 1996 Issues #25-28 | 1997 Issues #29-32]

[1998-2010 Issues #33-84]

Thank you for checking out this listing of our current California Territorial Quarterly issues and previous issues of the Dogtown Territorial Quarterly. There are links to each of the years of Dogtown Territorial Quarterly issues (#1-50) above. A short review of each article is also included.

DTQ back issues sell individually for $5.75; $4.50 each if you purchase four or more issues. Add $3.00 shipping per order.

A complete set of issues #1-50 sells for $225.00 shipped in the United States. Add $10.00 shipping. Total delivered price: $235.00

Issues #2 & #3 are not available except in complete sets.

Subscriptions to the California Territorial Quarterly (new name beginning with issue #51) are $18 per year in the United States.

CTQ back issues sell individually for $5.75; $4.50 each if you purchase four or more issues. Add $3.00 shipping per order.

 

Send Orders to: CTQ, 6848 U Skyway, Paradise, California 95969

To Order With a Credit Card Call 1-877-397-3363

All Other Calls (530) 872-3363

We Accept Orders Monday - Friday from 9am to 9pm
Saturdays 9am to 3pm

Retail Store Open 10am-5pm Monday-Friday,
10am-3pm Saturdays (Pacific Time)

Formerly known as the Dogtown Territorial Quarterly

California History At Its Very Best

email: info@californiahistory.com

 

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