Issue #6 Cover Issue #27 Cover

Formerly known as the Dogtown Territorial Quarterly

California History At Its Very Best

To Read a Full Length Sample Article Click Here

 

[1990 Issues #1-4 | 1991 Issues #5-8 | 1992 Issues #9-12 | 1993 Issues #13-16]

[1994 Issues #17-20 | 1995 Issues #21-24 | 1996 Issues #25-28 | 1997 Issues #29-32]

[1998-2010 Issues #33-84]

Thank you for checking out this listing of our current California Territorial Quarterly issues and previous issues of the Dogtown Territorial Quarterly. There are links to each of the years of Dogtown Territorial Quarterly issues (#1-50) above. A short review of each article is also included.

DTQ back issues sell individually for $5.75; $4.50 each if you purchase four or more issues. Add $3.00 shipping per order.

A complete set of issues #1-50 sells for $225.00 shipped in the United States. Add $10.00 shipping. Total delivered price: $235.00

Issues #2 & #3 are not available except in complete sets.

Subscriptions to the California Territorial Quarterly (new name beginning with issue #51) are $18 per year in the United States.

CTQ back issues sell individually for $5.75; $4.50 each if you purchase four or more issues. Add $3.00 shipping per order.

 

Send Orders to: CTQ, 6848 U Skyway, Paradise, California 95969

To Order With a Credit Card Call 1-877-397-3363

All Other Calls (530) 872-3363

We Accept Orders Monday - Friday from 9am to 9pm
Saturdays 9am to 3pm

Retail Store Open 10am-5pm Monday-Friday,
10am-3pm Saturdays (Pacific Time)

email: info@californiahistory.com

 

Articles in 1994 Spring Issue #17

Special California Gold Rush Issue

Issue #17 Cover

[New! California Natural Gold Nuggets]

The California Gold Discovery
By Rosanne McHenry

The author Rosanne McHenry is the Chief Ranger at Marshall Gold Discovery Park in Coloma, California, the site of the gold discovery by James Marshall in January 1848. Her article describes the actual discovery and the momentous changes in California that resulted from it. Marshall Gold Discovery Park Internet Website.

James Wilson Marshall
By Donovan Lewis

This biography of James Marshall is researched and written by Donovan Lewis who portrays James Marshall at the Marshall Gold Discovery Park in Coloma during their living history programs. It is reprinted in a slightly revised form from Donovan's book, Pioneers of California.

Gold at Reading's Bar on Clear Creek, Shasta County
By Madge Walsh

At the time she wrote this article, Madge Walsh was the editor of the Shasta Historical Society's annual publication known as the "Covered Wagon." She describes the second major discovery of gold in California made by Pioneer Pierson B. Reading after he visited the diggings discovered by Marshall at Coloma.

John Bidwell and the Golden Feather
By James Lenhoff

This story is about the discovery of gold on the Feather River by John Bidwell in 1848 and was researched and written by James Lenhoff, past president of the Butte County Historical Society and director of the Cherokee Museum near the famous Cherokee Hydraulic Gold Mine.

Wealth and Shadows, The Gold Rush and the California Indians
By Paul Bowman

Paul Bowman of Paradise, California describes the plight of the California Indians, which only worsened with the discovery of gold in 1848. The great search for mineral wealth was the final blow in a series of disasters from which they never fully recovered.

Near Disaster on the Lassen Trail
By Steve Schoonover

The Gold Rush migration of 1849 is one of the epic moments in American history. Few people realize how close it came to being one of the epic disasters of all time, especially on the Lassen Trail in northern California. Steve Schoonover of Chico weaves the tragic tale.

Dogtown U.S.A. - Shasta County
By Ron Tamburello

This article is the second in our series celebrating the various towns, rnining camps and other settlements that were once named Dogtown. The author, Ron Tamburello, shares with us the history of the short-lived camp in Shasta County along the banks of Dog Creek.

William B. Ide
Pioneer, Bear Flagger & Builder, Part 2

By Benjamin M. Hughes

In part 2 of Ben Hughes' comprehensive series on Ide, he describes the journey of the Grigsby-Ide party from Fort Hall on the Snake River in Idaho to Sutter's Fort in the wilderness of northern California.

Historical Perceptions
The Controversy Surrounding William B. Ide, Part 2

By Sharon A. Brown

In part 2 Sharon Brown examines Ide's activities after the Articles of Capitualation were signed in Sonoma in June 1846 and his relationships with the Bear Flaggers who took control.

Robert B. Semple
Bear Flagger, Publisher and Town Builder. Part 4

By Bill Anderson

Part 4 describes Robert Semple's push for California statehood, his participation in the first California Constitutional Convention and his selection as president of the convention, his withdrawal from his partnership with Thomas O. Larkin in developing Benicia, and his untimely death in Colusi County.

Click Here for Issue #17 Trivia Test

 

 

Articles in 1994 Summer Issue #18

Issue #18 Cover

Saga of the Stephen's-Townsend-Murphy-Party of 1844, Part I
By James J. Rose

In 1844 the Stephens-Townsend-Murphy party accomplished the first successful crossing of the Sierra Nevada by a party of emigrants with their wagons. Their courage and determination was typical of the many pioneers who followed in their tracks in later years, including the ill-fated Donner Party of 1846.

William B. Ide
Pioneer, Bear Flagger & Builder, Part 3

By Benjamin M. Hughes

Chapter 3 discusses the arrival of the Ide party at Suner's Fort, his short-lived partnership with Peter Lassen at Rancho Bosquejo, his management of the rancho of Josiah Belden and the events that led to the Bear Flag Revolt in Sonoma.

The Mountain Meadows Massacre
Utah Territory, September 11, 1857

By Richard W. Rohrbacher

In September 1857 a party of emigrants were attacked in southern Utah as they rested and recuperated from the rigors of their journey to California. The resulting massacre of nearly 100 people was one of the worst disasters in emigrant trail history.

The Camel Experiment in California
By George R. Stammerjohan

Spurred by a hope for improved and economical transport across the more arid sections of the West, the U. S. Government dusted off an old plan to experiment with camels as freight animals. Some 75 Mediterranean camels were imported for this purpose in the mid-1850s. There is myth and reality about the Army's camels and the truth is more interesting than the fiction which surrounds the story.

The Ords of Ord Bend
Blue Bloods and Battlefields

By Shirley Stasko

The Ord brothers were major California landowners between 1850 and the turn of the century. The name lives on in several places: Ordbend, Ord Ranch Road in Gridley, Fort Ord in Monterey, Ord, Nebraska and an Ord military monument in the National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia.

Justice, Sierra County Style
By Ronald W. Hayes

This story about frontier justice details the first hanging of a woman in Downieville, California in 1851 as well as several others until death sentences were mandated to be carried out by the wardens of the state's two prisons in San Quentin and Folsom by the California State Legislature in 1891.

Dogtown U.S.A. - Butte County
By Ron Tamburello

In our continuing series celebrating the various towns and settlements that were once named Dogtown, we spotlight the mining camp honored with the name of man's best friend in Butte County, the namesake of the Dogtown Territorial Quarterly

The Great Siskiyou Train Robbery
By Fred E. Green

On October 11, 1923 the Shasta Limited, Train #13, was robbed by the De Autremont brothers as it came through Tunnel #13 on the Shasta division of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Before it was over four men lay dead, three shot down in cold blood and the other killed by an explosion. No loot was taken, the murderers escaped, and one of the largest man hunts ever in U. S. history lasted nearly four years before the culprits were apprehended.

Click Here for Issue #18 Trivia Test

 

Articles in 1994 Fall Issue #19

Special Sutter's Fort Issue

Issue #19 Cover

John Sutter and His Fort
By John Kelly and George R. Stammerjohan

Researched and written by two men who are long-time volunteers at Sutter's Fort, this article might be considered the definitive history of Sutter and his fort This article grew out of the cultural inventory for Sutter's Fort State Historic Park and the General Plan published in September 1990 and Ms. Eileen Hook's "New Helvetia: The Dream and the Reality, The Sutter's Fort State Historic Interpretive Plan," Office of Interpretive Services, 1987.

Sutter's Indian Guard
By George R. Stammerjohan

John Sutter's settlement in the wilderness of northern California needed a source of labor to build the colony he envisioned and the local Miwoks, seeking sanctuary and protection from the punitive actions by General Mariano Vallejo, offered Sutter their loyalty and labor in return. Sensing the possibility of hostility from Vallejo, Sutter decided to construct an armed fort and, being short of men, selected 40 Miwok men to become his Indian guard force.

John Sutter and Hock Farm
By James Lenhoff

When Sutter sought refuge at his Hock Farm along the banks of the Feather River near the middle of his Nueva Helvecia land grant in 1849, he was looking forward to a second chance at renewing his fortunes in California. Although business and real estate misfortunes had cost him much of his 50,000-acre grant, he had been able to retain his 1200-acre Hock Farm.

Suttersville - A Pipe Dream at Best
By Eileen Hook

John Sutter took his role as colonizer very seriously. He had built several rooms to house the weary emigrants from the East but by the winter of 1845-46 it was apparent that there was not enough room, even on a temporary basis, to house them all. Sutter conceived the idea for a new town to settle the emigrants, giving him more room at the fort, providing a market for his crops, an artisan center for his workmen and home sites for the emigrants.

What Time Is It?
By Glenn Della-Monica

At Sutter's Fort in 1846, this question could have been answered in one of several ways. Your average mountain man or farmer may have looked at the position of the sun in the sky and guessed the time within a hour or two. A person with the means to possess an average quality watch or clock may have given the time within a few minutes. If the captain of a ship had recently set his watch from the from the time on his ship's chronometer, you might have the correct time within a second or two. This article discusses timekeeping and the types of timepieces available in 1846.

From Ruins to Renown
The Story of Old Sacramento's Restoration

By Rosanne Smith McHenry

Born literally overnight, the Sacramento of 1849 rose from the dreams and ambitions of the gold miners. As the city grew over the decades, that portion of the original town slipped into obscurity until by the 1920s it had become a place that only transients visited. Beginning in the late 1950s redevelopment of the Old Sacramento areawas started, bringing the historic town back to life.

Sutter's Last Stand
By Breverly Bass Beers

The fire at Hock Farm was the final blow to John Augustus Sutter. He and his wife, Annette, left California forever and moved East to Lititz, Pennsylvania where they raised their grandchildren and petitioned Congress seeking compensation for their loss of property in California as a result of the gold rush.

Some New Opinions on John Augustus Sutter
By George R. Stammerjohan

Sutter's historical image has been marred by poor, indifferent research, American tendencies toward Nativism and a demand to judge Sutter by standards unknown in his time. None of this does true justice to Sutter. He was not a heel, a scam artist, a liar, a myth-maker, a scoundrel, crook or cheat, contrary to what many revisionist historians claim.

William B. Ide
Pioneer, Bear Flagger & Builder, Part 4

By Benjamin M. Hughes

In part 4 Ben discusses Ide's tenure as Commander of the Bear Flaggers at Sonoma, his dismissal by John Fremont, his enlistment in the California Battalion and his return home to northern California.

Saga of the Stephens-Townsend-Murphy Party of 1844, Part 2
By James J. Rose

Part 2 discusses the final push by members of the party to reach California. After splitting into two groups, one party on horseback and the other in the wagons; they proceeded separately toward California. The horseback party amved at Sutter's Fort ahead of the wagons and a rescue party had to be sent to help the stranded emigrants in from the snow-covered mountains.

James McDowell, Sutter's Gunsmith
By Glenn Della-Monica

A short story about James McDowell who arrived at Sutter's Fort in the summer of 1845. He became Sutter's chief gunsmith, joined the militia and purchased land on the west bank of the Sacramento River where he planned a town he named "Washington."

Go To Sutter's Fort Web Page

Click Here for Issue #19 Trivia Test

 

 

Articles in 1994 Winter Issue #20

Issue #20 Cover

Legend into History
Facts & Fiction of the Lookout Lynching, Part I

By James O. Souther

In 1901, in Modoc County, California, the tiny hamlet of Lookout was the scene of a lynching. In the early morning of May 31, Calvin Hall, his sons, Frank (whom Calvin would not admit as his own), and James (who was Calvin's favorite); Dan Yantis, a drifter who was reputed to be the lover of Calvin's Indian wife Mary; and Martin Wilson, the fourteen-year-old son of Mary Hall, were taken from the Myers Hotel, which was also the jail for Lookout, and hanged.

The California That Nearly Was
By Richard W. Rohrbacher

This is the story of an Irish priest, Father Macnamara, who, in 1846, gained approval from the Mexican government for a land grant of some 5,000 acres in the San Joaquin Valley. Unfortunately for Macnamara, by the time he arrived the U. S. had just taken control of California following the Bear Flag Revolt and his plans for an Irish colony didn't develop as he had expected.

Aloha Oie, Polynesian Pioneers of Butte County
By Paul Bowman

When John Sutter came to California, one of his stops was Hawaii, where he procured the services of several Hawaiians known as "Kanakas," who accompanied him to California where he established a settlement he named New Helvetia; more commonly known as Sutter's Fort. This is the story of one of Sutter's Hawaiian laborers (and others) who migrated north to live among the Maidu Indians in the foothills of Butte County in northern California.

Kibbe's Campaign
By Steve Schoonover

In 1859 a California state military force known as Kibbe's Campaign rounded up hundreds of Indians in northern California, killed 200, and force-marched the rest to reservations.

Sam Clemens & Reuel Gridley
Prospectors from Hannibal

By William Hathorn

Samuel Clemens and Reuel Gridley both grew up in the Mississippi River town of Hannibal, Missouri and later crossed paths in Virginia City, Nevada, when in the interest of the U. S. Sanitary Commission, they promoted a sack of flour to raise money for sick and wounded Civil War soldiers.

Gentleman John
By Chris Burchfield

John Nugent was the editor of a San Francisco newspaper and he defended the articles he published that offended others by dueling with pistols. Known as a "fighting editor," this article descibes his exploits during the early l850s.

William B. Ide
Pioneer, Bear Flagger & Builder, Part 5

By Benjamin M. Hughes

In part 5 of Ben Hughes' series on William B. Ide, he tells how Ide returned home after the Bear Flag Revolt, was appointed Alcalde and Surveyor, went gold mining, purchased two farms and was eventually elected Associate Justice of Colusi County.

Click Here for Issue #20 Trivia Test

 

To Read a Full Length Sample Article Click Here

 

[1990 Issues #1-4 | 1991 Issues #5-8 | 1992 Issues #9-12 | 1993 Issues #13-16]

[1994 Issues #17-20 | 1995 Issues #21-24 | 1996 Issues #25-28 | 1997 Issues #29-32]

[1998-2010 Issues #33-84]

Thank you for checking out this listing of our current California Territorial Quarterly issues and previous issues of the Dogtown Territorial Quarterly. There are links to each of the years of Dogtown Territorial Quarterly issues (#1-50) above. A short review of each article is also included.

DTQ back issues sell individually for $5.75; $4.50 each if you purchase four or more issues. Add $3.00 shipping per order.

A complete set of issues #1-50 sells for $225.00 shipped in the United States. Add $10.00 shipping. Total delivered price: $235.00

Issues #2 & #3 are not available except in complete sets.

Subscriptions to the California Territorial Quarterly (new name beginning with issue #51) are $18 per year in the United States.

CTQ back issues sell individually for $5.75; $4.50 each if you purchase four or more issues. Add $3.00 shipping per order.

 

Send Orders to: CTQ, 6848 U Skyway, Paradise, California 95969

To Order With a Credit Card Call 1-877-397-3363

All Other Calls (530) 872-3363

We Accept Orders Monday - Friday from 9am to 9pm
Saturdays 9am to 3pm

Retail Store Open 10am-5pm Monday-Friday,
10am-3pm Saturdays (Pacific Time)

 

Formerly known as the Dogtown Territorial Quarterly

California History At Its Very Best

email: info@californiahistory.com

 

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